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NAIDOC Week in Fremantle, 2013

Posted: Tuesday, August 6, 2013 in Uncategorized by Posted by

NAIDOC is a week of celebrations held each year in July throughout Australia, to celebrate and commemorate Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people’s culture, history and achievements. These particular events are celebrated not only by the Indigenous community, but Australians from all walks of life. We here at Didgeridoo Breath are always in full support of all celebrations, and what better way to support NAIDOC week then to be lucky enough to teach some Indigenous and non-Indigenous boys from Christ Church Grammar School some cool techniques on the didgeridoo. A number of the Indigenous boys were from Kununurra and another from Broome. Three boys could already rip a few sounds from the didg’ while the others picked up new techniques along the way. Over a period of six weeks, Zac was teaching the young men some traditional rhythms in preparation for their NAIDOC week celebrations. Zac was invited to share in the celebrations at Christ Church Grammar School (CCGS) in Claremont, Western Australia, where the boys performed the didgeridoo piece, followed by a traditional Kununurra dance, accompanied by didge and clap sticks. Zac told us here about the performance and how incredible it was to see what he had showed the boys, and of course to see some traditional dance from the North-West. We look forward to keeping in contact with the CCGS young men over the next few years to see how their impressive didge playing is going.

Here are some quick facts about NAIDOC Week.
–    NAIDOC stands for National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee.
–    With a growing awareness of the distinct cultural histories of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, NADOC was expanded to recognise Torres Strait Islander people and culture. The committee then became known as the National Aborigines and Islanders Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC). This new name has become the title for the whole week, not just the day. Each year, a theme is chosen to reflect the important issues and events for NAIDOC Week.